Click On Globe To View Forum Visitors From Around The World

About This Forum

This snuff bottle community forum is dedicated to the novice, more experienced, and expert collectors. Topics are intended to cover all aspects and types of bottle collecting. To include trials, tribulations, identifying, researching, and much more.

Photobucket

Among other things, donations help keep the forum free from Google type advertisements, and also make it possible to purchases additional photo hosting MB space.

Forum Bottle in the Spotlight

Charll shared this beautiful Xianfeng (1851-1861) dated bottle depicting NeZha combating the Dragon King amongst a rolling sea of blue and eight mythical sea creatures.

"The Peter Bentley Snuff Bottle Collection"
and "introduction by Bill Patrick"


Chinese Snuff Bottle Discussion Forum 中國鼻煙壺討論論壇
January 28, 2022, 10:49:54 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
  Home Help Search Contact Login Register  

Carved Relief Biscuit Snuff Bottle

Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Carved Relief Biscuit Snuff Bottle  (Read 61 times)
rpfstoneman
Private Boards
Hero Member
***
Gender: Male
Posts: 2035



« on: January 09, 2022, 10:49:08 pm »


All,

This bottle was found at an online Asian Arts Dealer here in California, Zentner Collection, Inc. in Emeryville, CA.  I had been wanting this bottle after spotting online over two years ago, but the asking price was beyond what I thought was reasonable.  After continually looking at the bottle periodically over the last two years without it being sold, I finally reach out to the dealer prior to Christmas and made what I thought was a more reasonably priced offer.  Well, my Christmas wish came to fruition when my offer was accepted.  Here is the bottle I had been pining for over the last few years.  I have a number of molded relief bottles, but this is the 1st carved relief bottle I've acquired.

Carved Relief Biscuit Snuff Bottle:
A compressed pear-shaped flask form bottle of yellow glaze that sets on a straight oval foot rim, carved in high relief with a wrapping sinuous five-clawed dragon in pursuit of the ‘flaming pearl of wisdom’ amongst ribboned clouds/smoke wisps.  Unmarked base and unknown artist.  A flattened bead coral stopper with a green stained ivory collar and bone spoon.
Height is 2 ½ inches (6.3 cm) without stopper. 

Period: ca. 19th century, likely 1875-1908.

Condition: Fine, but at least three minor almost indistinguishable nibbles in the carved design.  Residual snuff lining the bottle interior upon receipt.   

Provenance:  Collection of Howard Kaplan

If anyone knowns who the artist may be, please let me know.  Enjoy, Charll
   


* 100_3288g.jpg (260.37 KB, 800x800 - viewed 22 times.)

* 100_3284c.jpg (241.79 KB, 799x800 - viewed 18 times.)

* 100_3285d.jpg (220.88 KB, 799x800 - viewed 13 times.)

* 100_3286e.jpg (237.21 KB, 800x800 - viewed 10 times.)

* 100_3287f.jpg (227.84 KB, 800x800 - viewed 13 times.)

* 100_3281a.jpg (248.65 KB, 800x800 - viewed 13 times.)

* 100_3282b.jpg (259.89 KB, 800x800 - viewed 15 times.)
Report Spam   Logged

Charll K Stoneman, Eureka, California USA, Collector Since 1979.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter

George
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 11166



WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2022, 07:38:19 am »

Nice one Charll. Congrats on your patience and adding this one to your collection.

I cannot help but notice the unusual, or at least unusual to me is the expression on the dragon's face with very heavy looking eyes. Reminds me of old man Winter !

I looked for any similarities to Wang Bingrong and others within the book Elegance in Relief, but none of the carver's examples stand out.

Wonderful bottle Charll Smiley
Report Spam   Logged

"Experience Each Experience To The Fullest To Obtain The Most Growth"

My Snuff Bottle Journal
rpfstoneman
Private Boards
Hero Member
***
Gender: Male
Posts: 2035



« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2022, 11:39:48 am »


George,

Thanks for the comments and research time.  I too spent a lot of time pouring through the 'Elegance in Relief' book, as well as online searching, and found no artist with similar works.  The nearest artist in design details that I could find is of a little known artist Rongsheng, but could not find enough examples for a conclusive determination one way or another.

Charll   
Report Spam   Logged

Charll K Stoneman, Eureka, California USA, Collector Since 1979.

Wattana
Private Boards
Hero Member
***
Gender: Male
Posts: 5867



« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2022, 12:24:19 am »

Charll,

You have had quite a bonanza this Christmas! Congratulations on another fine acquisition.
I'm not a connoisseur of porcelain production, but I thought the term 'biscuit' meant 'without glaze'.
In the photos your bottle appears to have a clear glaze. Just curious.

Tom
 
Report Spam   Logged

Hooked since 1971

rpfstoneman
Private Boards
Hero Member
***
Gender: Male
Posts: 2035



« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2022, 12:46:11 am »

Tom,

You are technically correct in that biscuit often refers to a pottery fired without a glaze.  The use of biscuit here refers to the use a molding type clay as the base, which is different from a more traditional porcelain.  A biscuit tends to be less transparent then a true porcelain clay or slip pour slurry clay that is used in molds, and when fired the latter become very to relatively transparent. 

Charll   
« Last Edit: January 12, 2022, 12:58:21 pm by rpfstoneman » Report Spam   Logged

Charll K Stoneman, Eureka, California USA, Collector Since 1979.

Fiveroosters aka clayandbrush
Private Boards
Hero Member
***
Gender: Male
Posts: 3604



« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2022, 03:09:00 am »

Dear Tom,
Charll is right but I think that he forgot to mention about temperature.
By biscuit it is meant to fire a piece at a lower temperature than that necessary for porcelain (about 1350 degrees Celsius). That way you obtain a dry item, which is ceramic but not yet porcelain, hence it is not yet vitrified, thus opaque.
A biscuit piece, being dry, is less absorbent, hence you can add enamels on it and fire it again at the lower temperature required by the enamels.
So you can have two types of enameled ceramics: the porcelain ones, where the piece is first fired at porcelain temperature with its transparent glaze, on which enamels are applied and fired again. These have bright colors.
Or the biscuit ones, where enamels (if enameled) are directly applied on the body without the glaze under them. These have opaquer colors.
You are right that Charll’s bottle is brighter than a simple biscuit one; I think that a clear transparent enamel has been applied on it.
If it were porcelain, it would be white. Being biscuit, it has that straw color.
Kind regards
Giovanni
Report Spam   Logged

rpfstoneman
Private Boards
Hero Member
***
Gender: Male
Posts: 2035



« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2022, 01:19:09 pm »


Giovanni,

Thank you for providing the additional information to Tom's comment/question.  I was being lazy  Tongue  and did not get into the temperature discussion, nor did I wish to venture into a clay composition topic.  As you mention, for a biscuit composition bottle I use the key of the 'straw color' on the unglazed areas of the bottle and the observation of less transparency (i.e., being more opaque) when backlit with a light.

Charll 
Report Spam   Logged

Charll K Stoneman, Eureka, California USA, Collector Since 1979.

snuffmke
Private Boards
Sr. Member
***
Gender: Male
Posts: 318



« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2022, 08:51:59 am »

Charll,

Great story. Your patience definitely paid off. A very detailed biscuit bottle.

Brian
Report Spam   Logged

Brian – A third generation collector with champagne tastes and a beer budget.

Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal