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'Tea-Dust' Monochrome

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Author Topic: 'Tea-Dust' Monochrome  (Read 5595 times)
rpfstoneman
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« on: July 14, 2012, 01:05:08 am »

Over the years I have always appreciated the simplicity of the monochrome glazed snuff bottle made in porcelains and stoneware, and the old earth ware herb and medicine bottles of monochrome glazes.  Never had the chance to pick up a good quality one at a reasonable price until now.  I am setting at my desk cataloging this bottle, so I thought I would share this ‘tea-dust’ glazed bottle that has just been acquired with those that might have an interest.

Stoneware Tea-Dust Glazed Snuff Bottle
A Chinese stoneware snuff bottle with tea-dust glaze. Cylinder form with rounded shoulder and beveled raise footrim.  c. 1800-1880.  Green to white Burmese jade stopper mounted with a Hong Kong (1949) five cent piece as a collar. Simple spade shaped ivory spoon.  Glazed base with no mark.  Height 2 3/4".

This bottle is from the Collection of John W. Sinclair of California, and was purchased in Beijing in 1990.


Chayemo (tea-dust) glaze
High-fired green speckled glaze. A 'tea dust' glaze first occurred at kilns in Shaanxi and Henan during the Tang dynasty. Tea-dust glazes were used on a multitude of pottery even in the Ming dynasty and actually on provincial wares during the Qing as well. In the Yongzheng period during the Qing dynasty 'tea-dust' glaze was revived and developed in Jingdezhen for use on Imperial wares, probably in an imitation of bronze.



As quoted from “The Meriem Collection, Important Chinese Snuff Bottles , Part II”, Christies, March 19, 2008, pg 96, lot 255:

“Snuff bottles decorated with tea-dust glaze are relatively rare and often spectacular because of the thickness and unpredictable nature of the glaze.  During the reigns of the Yongzheng and Qianlong emperors, there was significant experimentation at the Imperial kilns to increase the range of fine monochrome wares, although few if any snuff bottles were produced until late in the 18th century.  The aim was not only to produce attractive colors but also to achieve interesting textures.

Tea-dust was used as early as the Tang dynasty on ewers and small cup produced at the Yaozhou kilns.  However, it was not until the early 18th century, during the reign of the Yongzheng emperor, that the glaze was used on a variety of ceramics.  Snuff bottles covered with a tea-dust glaze began to be produced only in the mid-Qing period, and continued in occasional production during the 19th century.”


Charll's Friday Night Bottle
« Last Edit: February 28, 2013, 04:12:33 pm by Bottle Guy » Report Spam   Logged

Charll K Stoneman, Eureka, California USA, Collector Since 1979.

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George
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« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2012, 02:00:50 am »

It's a wonderful bottle Charll...

I also appreciate very much the simplicity of a monochrome glazed bottle..

Say.., very curious.. The crackled Mustard Yellow bottle which I am now pretty sure is also a stoneware, is very light weight..

Does this stoneward bottle of yours also seem extra light weight ?
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rpfstoneman
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« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2012, 02:33:12 am »

George,

No, the bottle is relatively thick walled and has the feel of a stone bottle of the same size.  Weight without the stopper is 62.2 grams.

Charll
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Charll K Stoneman, Eureka, California USA, Collector Since 1979.

George
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« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2012, 03:21:41 am »

Interesting..  That is twice the weight of my thick wall 3" bottle..

Hmmm....
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Pat - 查尚杰
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« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2012, 06:10:13 am »

Both are very nice bottles guys! Could this have to do with the density of the base materials and the mixture?
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Best Regards

Pat
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« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2012, 07:27:15 am »

Charll,

Beautiful, wonderful bottle !!

Misu
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Wattana
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« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2012, 10:26:10 am »

Charll,

I love understated bottles, and this is one of the finest of this type I have seen. Congratulations!

It could be that George's crackled mustard yellow is made from a totally different recipe of clay, which would explain the difference in weight.

Tom
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Tom
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George
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« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2013, 07:52:21 pm »

Just wanted to share this stunning Tea Dust piece..

It almost has a florescent appearance...

Bottle is covered in tea dust glaze of dark brown color and yellow-green speckles. Circular foot is also glazed.

6.8 cm



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Wattana
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« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2013, 09:45:33 pm »

Thanks George,

That glaze finish is quite spectacular. 
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Tom
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« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2013, 10:03:38 pm »

Like the Tea-dust bottles...the simplicity is quite beautiful...like the coin collar also.
Danna
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Danna
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« Reply #10 on: March 25, 2013, 02:06:49 am »

Very nice examples Charll and George, showing different types of this fascinating glaze.
Dear George, the foot may look fully glazed because of the surface brownish burnt that usually has some shine, but it isn't. Glaze edges are clearly visible in your picture.
Pieces fully glazed should show the stilt, or support, marks. On porcelain, very few ware is fired on supports while it is more common on Japanese ware.
Giovanni


* tea4_zps4c8e803a.jpg (49.69 KB, 324x412 - viewed 25 times.)
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George
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« Reply #11 on: March 25, 2013, 02:18:19 am »


Dear George, the foot may look fully glazed because of the surface brownish burnt that usually has some shine, but it isn't. Glaze edges are clearly visible in your picture.
Pieces fully glazed should show the stilt, or support, marks. On porcelain, very few ware is fired on supports while it is more common on Japanese ware.
Giovanni


Thank you Giovanni !  Smiley
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Wattana
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« Reply #12 on: March 25, 2013, 03:15:27 am »


...the foot may look fully glazed because of the surface brownish burnt that usually has some shine, but it isn't. Glaze edges are clearly visible in your picture.


Dear Giovanni,

There is possibly a little confusion with terminology, and this may be particular to snuff bottles only. The 'foot' generally refers to the 'base', while the part you have pointed out as being unglazed is usually called the 'foot rim'.

Don't ask me WHY this is so. I prefer to call the foot "the base" when it is recessed and surrounded by a rim. I only call the whole base a 'foot' when it is flat and in contact with the surface it is standing on.

Regards,
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Tom
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« Reply #13 on: March 25, 2013, 03:55:42 am »

Thank you dear Tom, I didn't know that some are referring to the base as "foot". Your approach is the right one in my opinion.
Kind regards
Giovanni
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Joey
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« Reply #14 on: March 25, 2013, 11:07:39 am »

Dear Charll,
    Gorgeous glaze!
Dear Tom L. and Giovanni. We use the terminology we do in the snuff bottle world, because we learned it. It is accepted in the snuff bottle world thanks to 'scholars' like Hugh Moss.

  We have a joke:  A collector dies and is at the gate of Heaven. All of a sudden, he sees someone familiar.  He says to the Angel Gabriel,"Isn't that Hugh Moss?" The reply," No. That is G-D, Trying To Be Hugh Moss".

Happy Passover,
     Joey
   
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Joey Silver, collecting snuff bottles since Feb.1970

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« Reply #15 on: March 29, 2013, 10:40:23 am »

Congratulations George !

It is a lovely piece with the glaze well executed.

Inn Bok
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« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2013, 01:27:26 pm »

Congratulations George !

It is a lovely piece with the glaze well executed.

Inn Bok

Oh no !  Not mine ....

Wish I could buy bottles like this one. Way outside my bottle budget...

Just wanted to share it with everyone here...  Smiley
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Lamlam
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« Reply #17 on: April 10, 2013, 07:16:46 am »

Just wanted to share this with you all.  Bought this many years ago when I had no clues at all (not that I have any clues about porcelain bottles now!!).

What do you think of it?  Age, glaze, shape....etc?

Cheers,

Curt


* glaze 1.JPG (98.71 KB, 480x640 - viewed 37 times.)

* glaze 2.JPG (91.96 KB, 480x640 - viewed 27 times.)

* glaze 3.JPG (91.63 KB, 480x640 - viewed 36 times.)
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Joey
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« Reply #18 on: April 10, 2013, 08:52:44 am »

Curt,
   I can honestly say I've never seen one like it! Not the shape, not the glaze, nothing.  My assumption is that it is totally modern - from the 1990s when some craftsmen in Jingdezhen were 'experimenting'.
When and where did you acquire it, if I may ask?
Joey
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Joey Silver, collecting snuff bottles since Feb.1970

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« Reply #19 on: April 10, 2013, 09:02:41 am »

Joey, I bought it about 10 years ago from a dealer on Hollywood Road in Hong Kong.  I have the impression that this dealer is not that good at snuff bottles since he is more focused on really old artifacts and jades.

If the modern klins are experimenting with new shapes and glazes, then there should be other pieces out there.  This puzzles me!

Can you make out of the symbol on the base?

Curt

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