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Dating and Identification of Early-period Japanese Cloisonne

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Author Topic: Dating and Identification of Early-period Japanese Cloisonne  (Read 3800 times)
George
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« on: February 05, 2011, 03:03:15 am »

Once a piece is verified as being Japanese in origin, it is now possible to verify when and who made it.
 
The following is a list of prominent characteristics of wares produced during Early period, the Middle period, and the Golden Age.
 
A Comparison with Identify Japanese Cloisonne & Distinguish From Chinese Cloisonne along with the three tables below (Bodies, Shapes, Wirework, Glazes and Enamelist ) with be the first step in determinating the date of manufacture.

Dating and Identification of Early-period Japanese Cloisonne

Bodies

First Half of Early Period 1838 - 1854

All pieces small, less than 30.5 centimeters in height, width, or diameter; most around 15 centimeters or less. Most on thin copper boddies, sometimes warped in firing.

Second Half of Early Period 1854 - 1865

All pieces small, less than 30.5 centimeters. Most pieces on heavy bronze or heavy copper forums, which help control warping. Metal forms and fittings of good quality and workmanship. Fittings sometimes enameled, sometimes not.

Shapes

First Half of Early Period 1838 - 1854

Traditional bronze-style shapes adapted from the Ming, or Japanese traditional shapes, made for use as well as decoration.

Second Half of Early Period 1854 - 1865

Shapes continue to include Ming adaptations, but more varieties of Japanese traditional shapes added: writing cases, prayer beads, sweetmeat baskets, and so on.

Wirework, Designs

First Half of Early Period 1838 - 1854

Adaptations of Ming-style cloisonne, and floweres, or landscapes with rocky outcropping and people, or animals, real or mythical, sometimes whimsically drawn. Wirework comparatively simple, crude. Spring coil and cloud cloisons to hold backgrounds of Ming-style designs in place.

Second Half of Early Period 1854 - 1865

Ming-style adaptations, Japanese textileweave dsigns, or design adapted from Pre-Kaji-period cloisonne, much smaller in scale and, more intricately detailed. Less reliance on background cloisons for Japanese designs. Spring coil and cloud cloisones for Japanese designs. Spring coil and cloud cloisons for background of Ming-style designs.
 
Glazes

First Half of Early Period 1838 - 1854

Glazes characterized by pits and concavities, sometimes rough, blurry, especially on the insides of bowls. Color sometimes inaccurately applied in cells. Colors include pale turquoise, sometimes on the green side, rest red, blac, and white. Perhaps later, yellow, yellowgreen, brown, purple, and blue.

Second Half of Early Period 1854 - 1865

Pits and concavities still present. Glazes more evenly applied and more smoothly finished. Colors no longer spill out of cells as commonly as in first half, depending on the skill of the artist. Colors inlclude all those used in first half, plus a more intense turquoise, although still pale compared to Chinese turquoise. In addition, new colors introduced: pink, purer white, and yellow, light green, brighter orange red.

Enamelists, Marks

First Half of Early Period 1838 - 1854

Possibly by Kaji Tsunekichi only or Kaji and his apprentices.
Known pieces unmarked.

Second Half of Early Period 1854 - 1865

Kaji Tsunekichi and his pupils. Some aprentice wares may have the characteristics of earliest works
Most pieces unmarked. Two and four character false Ming marks.
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