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Another extra special bottle that our fellow collector Pin shared. The "thousand word" classical text is painted by LI Ruchen with a beautifully shaped bottle of upright rectangular form, and sloping shoulders. Congratulations Pin !

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Contemporary Schools Of Inside Painting, by Peter Bentley

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Reign Marks on Qing Ceramics 1644-1912

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Gotheborg's Marks On Chinese Porcelain

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Chinese Snuff Bottle Discussion Forum 中國鼻煙壺討論論壇
June 28, 2017, 03:58:55 pm
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Snuff bottle hollowing quote.

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Author Topic: Snuff bottle hollowing quote.  (Read 385 times)
forestman
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« Reply #20 on: March 24, 2017, 04:50:52 am »

Thought I would share an illustration from "Pure Brightness Shines Everywhere" by EB Curtis.

I found a quote about jade carving that said that fully rotational cutting wheels replaced the traditional bidirectional treadle lathe in the late 1800's.

The illustration, dating from c. 1800, is probably from a Canton workshop as these pith paintings were produced there to be sold to foreigners that arrived via Canton.

This bidirectional treadle shown is the same technology as a bow saw which had been around for centuries. Press down with the right foot and it spins one way for a couple of turns before pressing with the left foot and it spins the other way for a couple of turns.

It's hard to see them using something as basic as this. They would have had potters wheels and spinning wheels far earlier, both of which would rotate in one direction. 

Stumpf was said to have to have taught moulding, making pleasing colours and using the wheel to engrave and polish and in 1708 an Italian mentions being in a room full of artisans carving floral patterns on glassware (in the Imperial glassworks) and a grinding room for detailed work.

The entire production of the Imperial glassworks through the 13 years of Yongzheng was close to 1000 items from records which seems very low until you think of the tools they were working with.

Regards, Adrian.


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Fiveroosters
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« Reply #21 on: March 24, 2017, 07:36:57 am »

Dear Adrian,
the picture that you have shown is quite interesting. I am posting it here again for ease.
The red arrow shows the right hand of the worker, holding the abrasive disc of the lathe. It seems improbable to hold such big glass jar with only one hand; maybe he is just making some fine final retouching.
It is interesting what shown by the yellow arrows. Those really seem snuff bottles, isnít it?
Giovanni


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forestman
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« Reply #22 on: March 24, 2017, 04:45:18 pm »

Dear Giovanni,

Yes, they look like snuff bottles.

I don't know what is running off the table into the bucket which looks like water but may be an abrasive sand or waste material that has been ground off that will be re used. The arch over the grinding wheel looks like better health and safety than they use today.

I enclose a picture of my ivory bottle with core drilling evidence in lots of places.

Regards, Adrian.


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forestman
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« Reply #23 on: March 30, 2017, 09:12:58 am »

Thought I would add quotes from "Chinese Snuff Bottles, Documentation of World trade West to East" published by the Oakland Museum in 1977 about the Helen Pritchard collection.

The Chinese lapidary cut stones with a revolving metal disk, using a paste abrasive of finely crushed minerals and water. The disk, mounted on a treadle, was operated by foot-power and formed an object by wearing down the surface of the stone.

The artist formed a snuff bottle with a lap wheel coated with emery abrasive. A tubular drill, grooved to hold emery paste, was used to hollow out the interior. A diamond drill, driven by a strong bow, allowed the lapidary to obtain a high relief and pierce intricate patterns in the hardest of minerals. These features became the distinguishing characteristics of late Qing Dynasty carvings.

It's a strange title for a book that really talks of trade East to West !

Regards, Adrian.
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