General information about the Site

This snuff bottle community forum is dedicated to the novice, more experienced, and expert collectors. Topics are intended to cover all aspects and types of bottle collecting. To include trials, tribulations, evaluating, identifying, researching, appraisals, and much more.

We are also currently working extra hard towards supporting, and giving well deserved recognition to all new and upcoming student artists of "Very Modern" inside painted bottles.

Photobucket

Among other things, donations help keep the forum free from Google type advertisements, and also make it possible to purchases additional photo hosting MB space.

Forum Bottle in the Spotlight

Adrain shared this beautiful Ye Zhongsan smokey rock crystal bottle

Photobucket

Photobucket

Gotheborg's Marks On Chinese Porcelain

Photobucket

Snuff Bottle Collector

The International Chinese Snuff Bottle Society


Chinese Snuff Bottle Discussion Forum 中國鼻煙壺討論論壇
August 22, 2017, 11:28:10 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
  Home Help Search Downloads Gallery Staff List Login Register  

SNUFF BOTTLES MENTIONED IN CHINESE MYSTERY NOVEL!

Pages: [1]
  Add poll  |  Print  
Author Topic: SNUFF BOTTLES MENTIONED IN CHINESE MYSTERY NOVEL!  (Read 142 times)
Joey
Private Boards
Hero Member
***
Gender: Male
Posts: 8269


View Profile
« on: January 27, 2017, 03:11:35 pm »

   A few weeks ago, I started reading mystery novels by a Chinese author resident in the USA, Qiu Xiaolong. They are called the 'Inspector Chen' Mystery series, and so far, there are 9 of them.
   This is the list:
1. Death of a Red Heroine
2. A Loyal Character Dancer
3. When Red is Black
4. A CASE OF TWO CITIES
5. Red mandarin Dress
6. The Mao Case
7. Don't Cry, Tai Lake
8. The Enigma of China
9. Shanghai Redemption

   The series is mainly based in Shanghai in the early 1990s (at least, so far - I'm in the middle of #4, A Case of Two Cities), with Comrade Chief Inspector Chen Cao as the main hero and character, but a wonderful cast of characters.

    In Chapter 19, towards the end of the chapter, there is a description of a peddler of snuff bottles! And it describes them as painted on the inside. It also describes them as useless (can't win 'em all... Roll Eyes)

    One minor problem I have with the series, which mixes a lot of descriptions of Chinese delicacies into the narrative, is the amount of pork, shellfish and blood involved in the delicious sounding dishes!  Grin Roll Eyes   

    I assume that the shellfish  is due to the Shanghai cuisine, although I assume that rice paddy eels, described as succulent and delicious when sliced, battered and fried, can be acquired anywhere there are rice paddies. But eels don't appeal to me; the Guangdong style pork would, if I still ate pork... Roll Eyes Grin And all the dumplings and noodle dishes sound wonderful. And equally forbidden to me. Sad Cry  Roll Eyes

    Seriously, though. I really am enjoying the series and the window it opens on mores and lifestyles in the PRC from the early 1990s, with reference to previous,  more troubling periods in PRC history.

     Highly recommended.

GONG XI FA CAI!   /   GUNG HEE FAT CHOY!

Shabbat Shalom & Happy New Lunar Month of Shevat,
Joey

   
Report Spam   Logged

Joey Silver, collecting snuff bottles since Feb.1970

Social Buttons

George
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 8283



View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2017, 03:19:24 pm »

Very interesting Joey...  An unusual thing to say, that the bottles are useless.. 

I purchased a book called, "A Chinese Village, Taitou, Shantung Province" in hopes that there would be some mention of snuff bottles. But nothing...
Report Spam   Logged

Joey
Private Boards
Hero Member
***
Gender: Male
Posts: 8269


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2017, 06:07:24 am »

Dear George,

     I have finished the series of 9 books. They were very well written and opened a window on the PRC (Peoples' Republic of China) of the 1990s, including the effects of the Cultural Revolution on people's lives, even 20 years later; relations between HCCs ("High Cadres' Children") and regular people; as well as problems and advantages of life in China under the CCP. And there were also advantages, I was quite amazed to realise.

   Well recommended.
Best to all,
Joey
Report Spam   Logged

Joey Silver, collecting snuff bottles since Feb.1970

NE collector
Jr. Member
**
Gender: Female
Posts: 97

Woman of the West, with Eyes on the East


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2017, 06:48:09 am »

Hi Joey,

Sounds like a Chinese version of the Agatha Christie novels. I can't wait to get find them and have a good read. Thank you for the great tip. Looking forward to reading them.

Best wishes,

Toni-Lee
Report Spam   Logged

Toni-Lee

Rube
Full Member
***
Posts: 183


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2017, 07:36:31 am »

Joey,

I've heard about this series! The main character loves to cook! Thanks for the plug, as I'll seek out this series.

Cheers,


Rheuben
Report Spam   Logged

Rube, 4th Generation Collector
Joey
Private Boards
Hero Member
***
Gender: Male
Posts: 8269


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2017, 08:22:50 am »

Dear Toni-Lee & Rheuben,
 
     Yes, the books are well written, and the chief protagonist does love to cook, though it seems he loves to eat more!  Grin Roll Eyes  He cooks a lot relatively, because he is single. But I have had a thought of planning a tour based on the restaurants and dishes he eats in the different places he goes to while on his cases (Shanghai & environs; Suzhou; Hangzhou; Wuxi; Beijing; Guangzhou; in the PRC (These I remember offhand; there might be more...). And LA & environs; St. Louis, MO; and possibly other places, in the USA.

    And Inspector Chen inspired me!
    A few weeks ago, I was hungry. In the refrigerator, I had boiled rice from a few days earlier, as well as raw eggs, prepared meats, sliced dill pickles from the USA, baby red, orange and yellow sweet peppers (capsicums for UK/Aussie/Kiwi folks),and mango & tamarind chutney.

    I chopped up 90 grams of corned beef and beef shoulder, and fried them in a TBL of olive oil, added in a beaten egg, shredded it as it cooked, added in the 200 grams of already boiled rice and the 3 chopped up peppers, and 2 minutes before I removed it from the heat, some chopped up dill pickle slices and some spices (Baharat, an Arab compound spice; sweet paprika; black pepper; I figured there was enough salt from the meats, and from the soy sauce I was going to add), and after 2 minutes, removed from the heat. I added a TBL of the chutney and 1/2 tsp of soy sauce, put it in a rice bowl, got out a pair of chopsticks, and had a Sino-Jewish meal!  Grin Roll Eyes Shocked

   Best,
 
Joey
Report Spam   Logged

Joey Silver, collecting snuff bottles since Feb.1970

Pages: [1]
  Add poll  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal