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Chinese Snuff Bottle Discussion Forum 中國鼻煙壺討論論壇
June 25, 2017, 05:31:29 am
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Amygdaloidal basalt?

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Author Topic: Amygdaloidal basalt?  (Read 148 times)
cshapiro
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« on: August 15, 2016, 11:15:15 pm »

Hi, I am 'thinking' this is amygdaloidal basalt, but am not quite sure. Any ideas on that, and possible dating of the bottle. I can't tell how well it's hollowed because there is a cork and spoon stuck inside that I can't seem to get out. It measures 6 cm high.

Thanks!


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« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2016, 12:04:36 am »

Hi Cathy,

I don't see any cork blocking the mouth opening. Do you mean the cork is stuck INSIDE the bottle? In that case I do not understand why you cannot check how well hollowed it is, by either shining a mini flashlight into it, or feeling your way around with a cotton bud.

From the photos it does look like amygdaloidal basalt, although it also looks similar to this lot in Eldred's upcoming auction, where the material is described as puddingstone.
https://connect.invaluable.com/eldreds/auction-lot/BROWN-AND-TAN-PUDDINGSTONE-SNUFF-BOTTLE-In-spade_D594015B39

Tom
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Tom
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cshapiro
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« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2016, 12:15:17 am »

Thanks Tom - it does look similar to that. Is there black puddingstone?

Yeah the cork is just right at the bottom of the neck and the spoon must be hitting the bottom. I read on here about stabbing the cork with a needle or wire, but don't have anything at the moment that would work and I'm afraid to dislodge it where I can never get it out.  Smiley 

Update: well I messed with it and the walls are thick but it's hollowed on the sides. And now has a permanent stick and cork in there! haha
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Cathy
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« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2016, 12:34:21 am »

Actually I just read that it could be amydaloidal basalt and puddingstone. The amydaloidal basalt is volcanic rock and the crystal formations inside it are puddingstone. It's also called volcanic puddingstone.

Although I know you can't always trust what you find online, so please correct me if I'm wrong.

And I honestly don't know what "well hollowed" really means, so I drew a pencil line of the hollowing so you can tell me.


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« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2016, 01:09:24 am »

Puddingstone is a generic term much used by snuff bottle collectors, to cover a range of conglomerates and breccias. These are created when pebbles and fragments of stone become cemented together through slow grinding activity on the earth's crust, such as through glacial action. The binding material is usually a fine grained sediment. The patterns and colour combinations can vary widely, but there is always sedimentary rock present.

Amygdaloidal basalt, on the other hand, is the result of violent volcanic activity. There will not be any sedimentary rock or fossils present. Only the almond shaped inclusions which give the stone its name (amygdalo = almond in Greek). So I think your bottle description is correct.

Corks often get stuck inside bottles. Be prepared to destroy the cork, which is easily replaceable. Using two long needles insert them into the cork and work them around to break the cork up into small fragments. Shake the bottle around upside down to remove the debris. Once the spoon is free of the cork it should fall out too.

PS: I wrote this before seeing your two update posts.
 
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Tom
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« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2016, 01:14:19 am »


And I honestly don't know what "well hollowed" really means, so I drew a pencil line of the hollowing so you can tell me.


In collector's jargon this would be described as "evenly hollowed".   Wink
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cshapiro
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« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2016, 01:18:01 am »

Ah! Thanks for letting me know Tom. The banded iron one is similarly hollowed. Now I know what to call it.

I get excited about these bottles. Every one is a mystery to unravel!
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« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2016, 07:38:42 am »

Cathy,
 
    I would disagree with Tom, and call that well hollowed out. As long as the bottle could (and hopefully did) hold a good amount of snuff, enough to use 5 or six times, and to share with at least 12 friends, so say, 20 or more 'snuff spoonfuls' (a few modern teaspoons full), it is fine.
Best,
Joey
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Joey Silver, collecting snuff bottles since Feb.1970

cshapiro
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« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2016, 12:09:24 pm »

Thanks Joey. Yes that bottle is a good size - 6cm and with that hollowing it would hold a great deal. I might even go fill it with something to test how many teaspoons it will hold. Wish I had a funnel! I have been on the lookout for them.

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Cathy
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