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Chinese Snuff Bottle Discussion Forum 中國鼻煙壺討論論壇
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Pewter enamel bottle - help with the mark

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Author Topic: Pewter enamel bottle - help with the mark  (Read 229 times)
Joey
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« Reply #20 on: April 09, 2016, 10:42:16 am »

Dear Tom B.,
 
      No, it can't be mine, since I bought mine in 1986, and it was sold by Clare on my behalf in the mid-1990s.
It is in my 1987 catalogue. So there are at least 2....  Grin

     Thank you for your serious study of the subject. Though I now wonder if my bottle, the mate to Marcos' example,
was in fact Jiaqing. Oh well, that's life.  Roll Eyes

   Best,
Shabbat Shalom,
Joey

From the description coming from Robert Hall in 1985, I suppose this could even be your SB that you sold.

moulded 'famille-rose' porcelain 'nine Buddhist lions' snuff bottle
Imperial kilns, Jingdezhen, Jiaqing gold-enameled seal mark and of the period, 1796–1820
6.85cm high.
FOOTNOTES
Treasury 6, no. 1210

瓷胎模製粉彩九獅滾球鼻煙壺
景德鎮官窯,金彩「嘉慶年製」篆款,1796-1820

Gilt Lions

Gold and iron-red enamels on colourless glaze on porcelain; with a slightly convex lip and concave foot surrounded by a convex footrim; moulded with a continuous design of nine Buddhist lions playing with five beribboned brocade balls on a lower plane of formalized clouds, with some of the upper plane of detail undercut to leave it free standing, framed between formalized lingzhi around the base and at the shoulders, the neck with a band of continuous leiwen (thunder pattern); all exterior surfaces of the outer body covered with iron-red enamel detailed in gold; the lip, neck rim, and footrim painted gold; the foot inscribed in iron-red seal script, Jiaqing nian zhi ('Made during the Jiaqing period'); the interior unglazed
Imperial kilns, Jingdezhen, 1796–1820
Height: 6.85 cm
Mouth/lip: 0.6/2.0 cm
Stopper: iron-red and gold enamels on colourless glaze on porcelain, moulded with a formalized chrysanthemum design

Condition: kiln condition; stopper probably not original, but a later replacement, possibly made in the 1970s

Provenance:
Robert Hall (1985)

Published:
Kleiner 1987, no. 223
Treasury 6, no. 1210

Exhibited:
Sydney L. Moss Ltd, London, October 1987
Creditanstalt, Vienna, May–June 1993

The interesting 'discovery' for me is in the carved details.  This SB is reticulated and has hand carved added details like the hairs of the tails, etc.
 
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Joey Silver, collecting snuff bottles since Feb.1970

Tom B.
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« Reply #21 on: April 09, 2016, 12:25:42 pm »

Dear Joey,

I just reread your post and see that I misunderstood it. I see now that you had one like Marcos' and the Jiaqing Mark & Period cinnabar red example in the 1987 Catalog.  What a beauty -

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Tom B.

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« Reply #22 on: April 09, 2016, 12:32:46 pm »

If your imitation bronze snuff bottle had a Jiaqing mark it was most likely mark & period.  I am positive that the snuff bottle that Marcos posted at the beginning of this thread is not Qianlong Mark & Period.  Other examples with Qianlong mark are usually described as circa 1800 - 1880, so I think that his would fit well in that time frame. 
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Tom B.

marcos
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« Reply #23 on: April 09, 2016, 01:19:40 pm »

Hello Tom,

This text found here http://www.e-yaji.com/Marakovic_images/Mar_nar/4_Jiaqing.asp also points to an early 19th date:

"Moulded porcelain reached its heights in the Jiaqing era, but the paucity of types from the early Daoguang era suggests that interest either declined abruptly with the death of the Jiaqing emperor or was already declining in the late years of his reign. One of the popular subjects that define the style of the Jiaqing reign is the design of nine Buddhist lions playing with brocaded, beribboned balls on a formalized cloud ground."
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Joey
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« Reply #24 on: April 09, 2016, 02:26:14 pm »

Dear Tom B.,

      I don't know why I did not illustrate the Jiaqing mark on the red glazed example. But you are correct - the Jiaqing marked example was the red one. My imitation bronze with turquoise glaze had an apocryphal Qianlong mark, of the type common from 1795 to 1799 (when Qianlong was still alive but had abdicated), and into Jiaqing.
Best,
Joey
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Joey Silver, collecting snuff bottles since Feb.1970

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