General information about the Site

This snuff bottle community forum is dedicated to the novice, more experienced, and expert collectors. Topics are intended to cover all aspects and types of bottle collecting. To include trials, tribulations, identifying, researching, and much more.

Photobucket

Among other things, donations help keep the forum free from Google type advertisements, and also make it possible to purchases additional photo hosting MB space.

Forum Bottle in the Spotlight

Adrian recently shared this wonderful Yan Yutian panelled bottle

Gotheborg's Marks On Chinese Porcelain

Photobucket

Snuff Bottle Collector


Chinese Snuff Bottle Discussion Forum 中國鼻煙壺討論論壇
July 21, 2018, 06:22:21 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
  Home Help Search Downloads Gallery Staff List Login Register  

Black Glass Snuff Bottle

Pages: 1 [2]
  Add poll  |  Print  
Author Topic: Black Glass Snuff Bottle  (Read 213 times)
rpfstoneman
Private Boards
Hero Member
***
Gender: Male
Posts: 1641



View Profile
« Reply #20 on: March 16, 2016, 08:17:10 am »

Quote
More I look at the pictures and more I think that it is not glass. Note that the bottle has the same uniform surface matt appearance. Usually on glass bottles we see some difference in polishing between the exposed areas and the recessed ones.

Giovanni,

I agree with your above observation, and I was letting George's 'Subject Header' influence my perspective with an assumption he knew it was glass. 

Charll
Report Spam   Logged

Charll K Stoneman, Eureka, California USA, Collector Since 1979.

Joey
Private Boards
Hero Member
***
Gender: Male
Posts: 8848


View Profile
« Reply #21 on: March 16, 2016, 08:57:55 am »

Dear Giovanni,

      I didn't realize that the temp. has to be so high. I thought that it could be like the silicon gloves and even cupcake baking forms they have, good up to 400 C. in the oven. Good I'm not making glass.  Grin
Best,
Joey
Report Spam   Logged

Joey Silver, collecting snuff bottles since Feb.1970

George
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 10425



View Profile WWW
« Reply #22 on: March 16, 2016, 10:47:52 pm »

Well, the bottle arrived.. In an effort to try and find what is "wrong" ( I am trying Joey !  Cheesy ) with the bottle, truth be told it is all looking "right". Both that it is likely Jet, and also 18th. 

I have tried to burn some pieces scraped with a dental tool from inside, but I just can't get it to burn. I don't seem to have anything around the house that I can use as a red hot element of any kind..

Before I commit to the reasons gathered "so far" supporting Jet and 18th, looking for one more comparison pic...

Tom....

Do you or anyone else with a Jet bottle have the ability to magnify the surface to about x200 ?

Wish I could back off this microscopes non adjustable x200 a bit.

I can not find a microscopic image online for the surfaces of either Jet or Lignite.




* microoutsidemouth.jpg (182.55 KB, 651x402 - viewed 11 times.)
« Last Edit: March 17, 2016, 12:13:13 am by George » Report Spam   Logged

George
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 10425



View Profile WWW
« Reply #23 on: March 17, 2016, 06:36:40 am »

Might have found what I was hoping for..   

Thinking may go ahead and move this bottle to Tom's, Jet/Lingite Thread..

Here in part 5 of 6 pages they are talking about the composition of coal from Arthropitus Gallica formation.  I would expect the structure of Jet/Lingite under magnification to be the same as compressed wood as shown in coal..   

FIG. 8. - Arthropitus gallica, St. Etienne; transverse section through the carbonized part.

"In the region, b, of Fig. 6, the ligneous elements have undergone an evident change of form, and the walls have been broken. This region, already filled by petrifying salts, but not completely hardened, has not been able to resist, as the region, a, an external pressure, and has become more or less misshapened. As for the not yet mineralized external portion, c, it has completely given way under the pressure, the walls of the different organic elements have come into contact, the calcareous or other salts have been expressed, and this region exhibits the aspect of ordinary coal, while at the same time preserving a little more hardness on account of the small quantity of mineral salts that has remained in them despite the compression".

"From the standpoint of carbonization there seems to us but little difference between the organic elements that occupy the region, a, and those that occupy b. If the former had not been filled with hardened petrifying matter, they would have been compressed and flattened like those of region c, and would have given a compact and brilliant coal, having very likely before petrifaction reached the same degree of carbonization as the latter. The layer of coal in contact with the carbonized or silicified part of the specimens is due, then, to a compression of the organic elements already chemically carbonized, but in which the mineral matter was not yet hardened and was able to escape".

With a little luck, we may be on track to be able and gauge the differences between the composition of "hard", and "soft" Jet with the above info..  More on that later.. 

This Jet bottle at x200 on the right, and the organic coal microscopic drawing at about x300/400 to the left for comparison. 


« Last Edit: March 20, 2016, 07:09:44 pm by George » Report Spam   Logged

Steven
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 4004



View Profile
« Reply #24 on: March 17, 2016, 03:12:51 pm »

Congratulations George!!

A great find.Smiley
Report Spam   Logged

George
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 10425



View Profile WWW
« Reply #25 on: March 17, 2016, 03:36:54 pm »

Thank you brother Steven !
Report Spam   Logged

Fiveroosters
Private Boards
Hero Member
***
Gender: Male
Posts: 2900



View Profile
« Reply #26 on: March 17, 2016, 05:47:08 pm »

Dear George,
I am glad that I was right in my suspicion that this was a jet bottle. But I think that you are too optimist in thinking that it is 18th century. I don't see the "hand" of that period there. But I may be wrong, what does others think about this?
Giovanni
Report Spam   Logged

George
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 10425



View Profile WWW
« Reply #27 on: March 17, 2016, 06:00:48 pm »

Dear George,
I am glad that I was right in my suspicion that this was a jet bottle. But I think that you are too optimist in thinking that it is 18th century. I don't see the "hand" of that period there. But I may be wrong, what does others think about this?
Giovanni


Actually, after researching and putting together a description for auction, I am with you in leaning towards 19th on this one... Early to Mid... Maybe closer to Mid..

Thank you Giovanni  Smiley  
« Last Edit: March 17, 2016, 06:32:22 pm by George » Report Spam   Logged

Joey
Private Boards
Hero Member
***
Gender: Male
Posts: 8848


View Profile
« Reply #28 on: March 17, 2016, 06:57:33 pm »

Dear George,

     It is wonderful news that you bought an early  - mid 19th c Jet bottle.
Congratulations!
Joey
Report Spam   Logged

Joey Silver, collecting snuff bottles since Feb.1970

George
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Gender: Male
Posts: 10425



View Profile WWW
« Reply #29 on: March 17, 2016, 07:07:07 pm »

Thank you Joey !
Report Spam   Logged

Pages: 1 [2]
  Add poll  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal