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Chinese Snuff Bottle Discussion Forum 中國鼻煙壺討論論壇
October 23, 2018, 03:28:09 am
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 91 
 on: September 18, 2018, 04:29:17 am 
Started by Stewsnuff - Last post by Wattana
Stew,

I agree with Joey's dating for your bottle, and that it is possibly Palace workshops.
It is a beauty, and will benefit greatly from the gold repair suggested.

Tom

 92 
 on: September 18, 2018, 02:33:24 am 
Started by Fiveroosters - Last post by Fiveroosters
Dear Ileney,
that bottle is a new one, while the one that I posted is an old nice bottle, pity of the “make up”.
I am posting here a side by side comparison. You can see the better shape, better potting, and the old base and paste.
The description made by the seller is off.
He says: “Pink Crackled Glazed over a white background”.
The correct definition should be: “White crackled glaze, pink stained”. (Actually the glaze is transparent, but it is usually called white glaze because of the white porcelain behind it.)
He also says: “raised and glazed foot rim”. That is not true, the foot rim is not glazed as usual, as you see by its matt surface.
About these stained bottles, what I do not know is if there is a way to totally eliminate that penetrant dye, may be by heating it. That could be interesting. In fact, if I knew how to go back to the original state I would have been interested in purchasing that bottle.
Dear Rube, yeas, you are correct. Since I knew the typical appearance of that penetrant dye on porcelain, having seen it many times in my previous job, I recognized it immediately. But without that experience, the fact that the pink can bee seen on the unglazed foot is clearly telling us that it has nothing to do with the glaze.
Kind regards
Giovanni

 93 
 on: September 17, 2018, 09:06:47 pm 
Started by Stewsnuff - Last post by George
I was wondering if there is any particular mm thickness associated with the term “well hollowed.” I always assumed “floater” was the term that literally meant it was hollowed well enough that the bottle would float in water.

I would say 3 to 5 mm, and yes, a well hollowed bottle will float in water. 


 94 
 on: September 17, 2018, 07:59:09 pm 
Started by Stewsnuff - Last post by ileney
What I didn’t know was if the presence of orange peel in the finish would have anything to say about how old the bottle is or provide any other information about it? Also, I was wondering if there is any particular mm thickness associated with the term “well hollowed.” I always assumed “floater” was the term that literally meant it was hollowed well enough that the bottle would float in water.

 95 
 on: September 17, 2018, 07:24:17 pm 
Started by Stewsnuff - Last post by George
1)The finish does perhaps appear to have a bit of an orange peel finish to it. Nephrite jade is particularly susceptible to undercutting in the sanding/polishing phase and it is very difficult to avoid. This is caused by the stone having areas that are slightly softer and those softer areas peeling off of the harder, lending a so-called "orange peel" mottled sort of finish instead of a brilliant, uniform shine. The lapidarists who cut jade all the time often advise special techniques for avoiding it, such as dragging the stone back and forth from wet to dry across the sanding and polishing wheels, avoiding heat, sanding very slowly, and using diamond powder on a wood wheel for finish. It seems every other person who cuts jade will have contradictory advice, but it is a skill and also is dependent upon the specific materials used to sand/polish and the quality of the stone as well. 2) I tried to follow the link to see Charl's definition of "well hollowed," but the link didn't work. I too would be curious to see this defined.

Yes indeed.. Nephrite has a fibrous makeup.. Like you mention, different lapidaries have different ways of tackling orange peel.  It can require the use of an series of abrasives that can include starting at 140, 280, 300, 1200, 3000, 8000, 14000, and on up to 50,000 and 100,000. Hard wooden wheels can also be used.

Sorry about the link I provided. It was meant to be private. I should not have posted it.. That is why the link will not work.. Apologies..

In a nutshell, a well hollowed bottle would have very thin walls, including the lapidary having worked up into the shoulder of the bottle so that the wall there is also very thin. If well hollowed then some like to use a term, "floater" to show just how well hollowed it is.

 96 
 on: September 17, 2018, 06:19:37 pm 
Started by Fiveroosters - Last post by Rube
Ileney,
I’m glad you posted another one, because I’m curious about this type after Giovanni’s post. If I had to guess, based on his post, the crackle on the foot is the giveaway?

Cheers,
Rube

 97 
 on: September 17, 2018, 03:28:00 pm 
Started by Stewsnuff - Last post by ileney
1)The finish does perhaps appear to have a bit of an orange peel finish to it. Nephrite jade is particularly susceptible to undercutting in the sanding/polishing phase and it is very difficult to avoid. This is caused by the stone having areas that are slightly softer and those softer areas peeling off of the harder, lending a so-called "orange peel" mottled sort of finish instead of a brilliant, uniform shine. The lapidarists who cut jade all the time often advise special techniques for avoiding it, such as dragging the stone back and forth from wet to dry across the sanding and polishing wheels, avoiding heat, sanding very slowly, and using diamond powder on a wood wheel for finish. It seems every other person who cuts jade will have contradictory advice, but it is a skill and also is dependent upon the specific materials used to sand/polish and the quality of the stone as well. 2) I tried to follow the link to see Charl's definition of "well hollowed," but the link didn't work. I too would be curious to see this defined.

 98 
 on: September 17, 2018, 02:58:44 pm 
Started by Fiveroosters - Last post by ileney
Is this also a new bottle or is it a crackle bottle that had pink in the cracks added a long time ago, as they claim? They don't claim that it is peachbloom glaze, but do claim it is 19th century. https://www.ebay.com/itm/19th-C-Chinese-Crackle-Glazed-Meiping-Form-White-Porcelain-Snuff-Bottle/252340176296?_trkparms=aid%3D111001%26algo%3DREC.SEED%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20160908105057%26meid%3D1b759f8cf1954a6ab8c970b6c78077ff%26pid%3D100675%26rk%3D3%26rkt%3D15%26sd%3D202438539106%26itm%3D252340176296&_trksid=p2481888.c100675.m4236&_trkparms=pageci%3Afa58d27f-bab2-11e8-b140-74dbd1801b01%7Cparentrq%3Ae915e2021650ab4c8352f8d7fff60a0d%7Ciid%3A1

 99 
 on: September 17, 2018, 09:57:11 am 
Started by Stewsnuff - Last post by OIB
Hi Stew,

Nice botttle you have !

Any possibility of you taking a close-up picture of the short-necked area of your bottle ? Just curious how the it was carved and polished there,

Thanks.

Inn Bok

 100 
 on: September 17, 2018, 09:48:02 am 
Started by snuffmke - Last post by OIB
Good craftsmanship for a bottle made about 40+ years ago.

Inn Bok

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